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AAA Replica Tissot T-Sport PRS516 Watches For Sale

Tissot was founded in 1853 by father and son team, Charles-Felicien Tissot and Charles-Emile Tissot. Since that time, the Tissot brand has pioneered an impressive number of advancements in watchmaking history, including the first mass-produced pocket watch, the first dual time-zone pocket watch, and the first plastic watch, among others. Tissot designers have boldly experimented with watchmaking materials over the years, such as wood and stone, some of which have become standards in the industry, including mother of pearl.
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Tissot T-Sport PRS516 Related News

  • Tissot - The new timeless duo

    The 2009 Tissot Heritage timepieces turn the clocks back to 1941 for their inspiration. Two limited editions preserve the aesthetics of an original 1941 Tissot wristwatch in a 'must-have' contemporary chronometer with COSC (Contrôle Officiel Suisse des Chronometres) certification. These timepieces even apply their proven precision to nature with an integrated telemetre to calculate the distance between the wearer and a lightening bolt. The 2009 Tissot Heritage watches have a fascinating story to tell, to both dedicated collectors and today's trendsetters.

    Timeless style
    The dial of both 2009 Tissot Heritage editions reflects the unrivalled precision of the Swiss 7753 chronograph movement inside via intricate, golden markings, giving it the character of a fine mechanical instrument. This masterpiece of timekeeping presents itself against the backcloth of a smooth, black dial. A row of intersecting circles, comprising two counters and a mesmerising spiral tachymetre in the centre, builds a bridge from 9 o'clock to 3 o'clock. The even numbers are boldly marked and interspersed with elongated rectangular indices. This rectangular form is mirrored by the 38 mm case's attachment elements which secure the crocodile leather bracelet in place in true geometric style.

    Memories that count
    One of the 2009 Tissot Heritage limited editions consists of just 333 numbered pieces. This model has a case made of pure 18-carat rose gold. The second edition being added to the year's collection comes in stainless steel and has 3,333 pieces. The number of each watch is engraved on the ornately decorated case back, which also incorporates a window through which to view the 27 jewel automatic movement at work. Both editions are chronometers, verified by testing carried out by the independent COSC over several consecutive days in five positions and at three temperatures. From all angles, these timepieces celebrate over 150 years of precision watch making, with Tissot adding its signature of confirmation on the front and back in the form of a historical logo. With these 2009 limited editions, Tissot introduces two of tomorrow's collectors' items today.


    Tissot, with its signature 'Innovators by Tradition', has been pioneering craftsmanship and innovation since its foundation in 1853. Today Tissot is a member of the Swatch Group, the world's largest watch producer and distributor. For over 155 years the company has had its home in the Swiss watch making town of Le Locle in the Jura mountains but now also has a presence in over 150 countries. The Tissot innovation leadership is enabled by the development of high-tech products, special materials and advanced functionality. With a broader, more versatile range of high-quality timepieces at an attractive price than any other Swiss watch brand, Tissot also expresses its commitment to making excellence accessible. As official timekeeper and partner of NASCAR®, AFL, CBA, MotoGP and the World Championships of cycling, fencing and ice hockey, Tissot is committed to respecting tradition, underlining its core values of performance, precision and setting new standards.

  • Encyclopedie - Montres pour aveugles

    L'ImpartialA number of blind people use hunter watches as they can lift the glass and calculate the hours according to the position of the hands by running their fingertips over the dial. Some are able to tell the time with relative approximation by touch alone; the majority however find it difficult to work it out, not to mention the fact that fingering the hands in this way, however gently, can cause them to break or at any rate shift in one direction or the other, thus increasing the scope for error. An Austrian from Vienna came up with the idea of replacing the Roman numerals on the dial with a sequence of conventional signs allegorically reminiscent of the hour denoted by them.The Lukaschovsky system (named after its inventor) consists in the representation of one o'clock by a dot, two o'clock by two dots, three o'clock by a triangle, four o'clock by a square, five o'clock by a five-point star, six o'clock by a zero. On the first half of the dial the signs are in relief while on the second half they are symmetrically reproduced but are concave. The hands are made of steel and are robust enough to withstand frequent finger contact. Another system devised by P. Tissot, a watchmaker from Le Locle (Switzerland), has the advantage over the previous watch of employing Braille characters, already familiar to the blind. Furthermore, the dial features minute divisions represented by tiny raised dots.EXAMPLES OF WATCHES FOR THE BLIND
    The A. Reymond Manufactury, true to its pioneering spirit, worked tirelessly at the cutting edge of technological and aesthetic advances in watchmaking. Accordingly, in the early 1950s, its engineers developed new products that would secure the reputation of the brand for over 20 years: 'jumping hours' digital watches and Braille watches for the blind. Even today, Auguste Reymond is the undisputed specialist in tactile watches for the blind, marketed under the ARSA (Auguste Reymond S.A.) trademark. A replica of a 'jumping hours' watch, dubbed 'Jumping Jive', was made in 1994. All 500 timepieces in this series are already treasured by collectors of rare watches.
    (Reymond Auguste SA / rue de la Promenade 29 / 2720 Tramelan BE / tel 032 487 42 46) / www.augustereymond.chOTHER WATCHES FOR THE BLIND
    Tissot "Silent T" watchesHot on the heels of the renowned "T-Touch" comes the "Silent-T". To celebrate its 150th anniversary, the Tissot watch brand - owned by the Swatch Group - has launched a watch which uses silent vibrations to tell the time. The partially sighted are a target public, but are not the only ones. "The Silent-T is first and foremost a watch for busy executives rushing between meetings who need to 'feel the time or set the vibration alarm without offending their business partners, knowing though that the discussion needs to be brought to a close", in the words of the Le Locle-based company.How does this new Tissot-signed innovation work? "By pressing briefly on the crown and then running your finger around the screen, the wearer can "feel" the time thanks to a constant vibration on the hour and intermittent vibrations for the minutes. These different vibrations correspond to one of twelve raised features on the bezel", explains the watchmaking firm. For the ultimate in discretion, the watch "comes with a silent vibrating alarm which, like the automatic time-setting, can be activated and checked simply by pressing the crown and moving the finger anti-clockwise around the screen".The design of this technology has taken years to develop. Tissot did not work alone. Numerous associations were involved "to ensure that the watch met all the requisite criteria". There is no doubt that it marks a breakthrough for the sight-impaired community.The "Silent-T" features a quartz movement with silent alarm. The tactile sapphire crystal glass is scratch-resistant. The watch is waterproof to 30 metres. It comes in a choice of a black, white or silver dial, a stainless-steel bracelet or a leather strap.The Lorm gloveTo launch this product in Switzerland, Tissot has backed a project set up by the UCBA (Swiss Union for the Welfare of the Blind). It is a Lorm glove "which, like the watch itself, combines touch and creativity for easy and efficient use", according to a spokesperson from Le Locle. For each watch sold in Switzerland, Tissot and its retailers will pay 15 francs each to support the UCBA project.This project is "the only one of its kind in the world", allowing sighted people to "enter the world of the deaf-blind and to communicate easily without having to undergo a lengthy apprenticeship". What does it involve? "The entire sound alphabet (or, for example, the letter c once and not c and k) is printed on the glove. By simply applying slight pressure of the finger to trace the lines, arrows and dots, it is possible to make yourself understood".This digital alphabet was developed by Hieronymus Lorm, whose real name was Heinrich Landesmann. Born in the Czech Republic in 1821, the essayist, journalist and playwright became almost blind at the age of 16 and created a system to allow the visually-impaired to converse.  

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